crimsoncorundum: (Default)

Kindle

From Amazon's book page:

Lady of Devices: A steampunk adventure novel (Magnificent Devices, Book 1):

London, 1889. Victoria is Queen. Charles Darwin’s son is Prime Minister. And steam is the power that runs the world.

At 17, Claire Trevelyan, daughter of Viscount St. Ives, was expected to do nothing more than pour an elegant cup of tea, sew a fine seam, and catch a rich husband. Unfortunately, Claire’s talents lie not in the ballroom, but in the chemistry lab, where things have a regrettable habit of blowing up. When her father gambles the estate on the combustion engine and loses, Claire finds herself down and out on the mean streets of London. But being a young woman of resources and intellect, she turns fortune on its head. It’s not long before a new leader rises in the underworld, known only as the Lady of Devices.

When she meets Andrew Malvern, a member of the Royal Society of Engineers, she realizes her talents may encompass more than the invention of explosive devices. They may help her realize her dreams and his . . . but sometimes the closest friendships can trigger the greatest betrayals . . .

I just finished reading this free e-book, and I must say I was positively surprised. Since I bought my Kindle Touch I have downloaded and started reading so many free books and most of them weren't good enough to finish. This turned out to be among the few that was well worth reading to the end. My main complaint is that the story is a little too short and seems to end sort of in the middle - not quite - there is a resolution of sorts - but it comes rather quickly and feels a bit sudden. Normally, I wouldn't buy the next book when the author leaves the reader hanging, but in this case, I might make an exception. As I mentioned above, there is a sort of ending, even if it's too sudden for my taste.

Claire is a likeable character. As the book progresses we get to know more likable characters, mainly young women. There are of course a few men - one sympathetic and another less so. Time will tell how they will develop. When the story begins Claire belongs to the upper class and is miserable that her mother won't consider letting her go to university. She is passionate about engineering and loves to drive a steam driven car, even though it's not considered 'ladylike'. Soon her circumstances change dramatically. Being a resourceful young woman, she handles her situation well and manages to save herself.

If this sounds like your kind of thing, visit Amazon as soon as you can. The book is still available for free if you hurry.

Date: 2017-07-27 03:02 pm (UTC)From: [personal profile] rusty_armour
rusty_armour: (umbrella)
It's great that you've been able to download so many Kindle titles for free. :-) Lady of Devices certainly sounds interesting, even if the plotting could have been handled a bit better. I have a friend who's into Steampunk, so I'll let her know about this book. Like you, she may decide to check out the other books in the series. :-)

Speaking of downloads, I finally started reading Miss Pym Disposes. Actually, I'm hoping to finish reading it in the next couple of days. I'm now on a Josephine Tey kick, so I'll be reading The Man in the Queue next. I still need to look into it, but I might sign up for an Open Library account. I noticed that Open Library has quite a few Tey titles. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any on Gutenberg.

Date: 2017-07-27 09:13 pm (UTC)From: [personal profile] rusty_armour
rusty_armour: (umbrella)
We both ended up downloading the book. :-) Actually, my friend found a free mystery while she was on Amazon. I haven't read this author before (and I don't know what the quality of the writing is like), but here's the link if you're interested: https://www.amazon.ca/Murder-Lighthouse-Exham-Mystery-Mysteries-ebook/dp/B015RR2C4C

Thank you very much for the Josephine Tey link! I believe that those links you provided for Miss Pym Disposes and The Man in the Queue were from the University of Adelaide. I will happily download the other available Tey titles tonight! :-D

That's really unfortunate about that one Sayers novel. I have to admit that I've only read the one Lord Peter Wimsey book (The Nine Tailors). I can't remember any overt racism or prejudice, but I read it several years ago and may not have been as sensitive then about such issues.
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